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News

Agency News Items - 2015

December

  • Railroad Commission of Texas Releases 2015 Year in Review

    December 21, 2015

    AUSTIN –The Railroad Commission of Texas today released the agency’s 2015 Year in Review highlighting the accomplishments, milestones and improvements achieved at the agency over the past year. For the first time the Commission is releasing its Year in Review in digital format. The interactive 2015 Year in Review includes video, photos, infographics and links to additional information. 

    The 2015 Year in Review reflects the work done at the Commission across all divisions on a daily basis in support of the agency’s mission to protect public safety and our natural resources while maintaining a fair, stable regulatory environment for the safe, responsible production of our energy resources. The new digital report provides an efficient and cost-effective way to make comprehensive Commission information easily accessible to the public and stakeholders.

    The Commission encourages readers to share the 2015 Year in Review using the hashtag #TxRRC.

  • Texas Oil and Gas Production Statistics for October 2015

    December 21, 2015

    AUSTIN – Production for October 2015 as reported to the Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) is 74,686,442 barrels of crude oil and 636,226,447 MCF (thousand cubic feet) of total gas from oil and gas wells. These preliminary figures are based on production volumes reported by operators and will be updated as late and corrected production reports are received.  Production reported to the Commission for the same time period last year, October 2014, was: 68,675,991 barrels of crude oil preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 86,735,398 barrels; and 610,601,042 Mcf of total gas preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 742,625,520 Mcf.

    The Commission reports that in the last 12 months, total Texas reported production was 1.009 billion barrels of crude oil and 8.4 trillion cubic feet of total gas. Crude oil production reported by the Commission is limited to oil produced from oil leases and does not include condensate, which is reported separately by the Commission.

    Texas preliminary October 2015 crude oil production averaged 2,409,240 barrels daily, compared to the 2,215,355 barrels daily average of October 2014. 

    Texas preliminary October 2015 total gas production averaged 20,523,434 Mcf (thousand cubic feet) a day, compared to the 19,696,808 Mcf daily average of October 2014. 

    Texas production in October 2015 came from 182,319 oil wells and 94,363 gas wells.

    For additional oil and gas production statistics, visit the RRC’s Oil & Gas Production web page.


    TABLE 1
      OCTOBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN OIL CRUDE OIL PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CRUDE OIL (BBLS)

        1.

    KARNES

    6,389,482

        2.

    LA SALLE

    4,356,415

        3.

    DEWITT

    3,936,081

        4.

    MIDLAND

    3,563,978

        5.

    MARTIN

    3,277,591

        6.

    UPTON

    3,274,125

        7.

    MCMULLEN

    3,163,668

        8.

    ANDREWS

    2,964,982

        9.

    REEVES

    2,717,046

      10.

    GONZALES

    2,674,758

     

    TABLE 2 – OCTOBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL GAS (GAS WELL GAS & CASINGHEAD) PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    TOTAL GAS (MCF)

        1.

    WEBB

    58,677,044

        2.

    TARRANT

    47,319,082

        3.

    PANOLA

    24,603,347

        4.

    DIMMIT

    24,088,356

        5.

    JOHNSON

    21,643,167

        6.

    KARNES

    20,651,697

        7.

    WISE

    19,626,873

        8.

    DEWITT

    19,280,306

        9.

    DENTON

    17,486,424

      10.

    LA SALLE

    13,687,930

     

    TABLE 3 – OCTOBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL CONDENSATE PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CONDENSATE (BBLS)

        1.

    DIMMIT

    2,263,902

        2.

    WEBB

    1,393,645

        3.

    KARNES

    1,222,576

        4.

    DEWITT

    1,068,688

        5.

    CULBERSON

    671,103

        6.

    LIVE OAK

    594,414

        7.

    REEVES

    341,169

        8.

    WHEELER

    294,120

        9.

    LA SALLE

    270,660

      10.

    LOVING

    180,204

  • Railroad Commissioners Applaud Congressional Action to Overturn Crude Oil Export Ban

    December 18, 2015

    AUSTIN -Railroad Commissioners today released the following statements on Congressional passage of legislation overturning the decades-old federal ban on crude oil exports. 

    Chairman David Porter said, “"My fellow Railroad Commissioners and I have worked hard to overturn the ban, whether it be appearing before Congress, the Texas Legislature, or educating decision-makers in Washington that lifting the ban would unshackle the U.S. energy sector and further enhance our nation’s stature as a global leader in energy. This ban is a relic of a bygone era that stifles competition and the potential for American job creation. Lifting the ban will finally allow American energy producers to compete on a level playing field in the international marketplace. This is a victory for both the Texas and U.S. economies." 

    Commissioner Christi Craddick said, “Lifting the antiquated U.S. crude oil export ban will be monumental for Texas oil producers long-term and an important tool for our country overall. The ability to export U.S. oil opens international markets to sales of our Texas energy resources, makes West Texas Intermediate crude price-competitive, provides greater stability and growth for our Texas oil and gas industry, and creates jobs here at home. Beyond Texas, oil exports will stimulate our national economy, boost national security, and extend a hand to our allies as we provide them a friendly, stable source of American energy.” 

    Commissioner Ryan Sitton said, “Lifting the crude export ban is critically important to Texas oil producers who are currently struggling with depressed commodity prices.  Oil is bought and sold in a global marketplace, and it made no sense that Iran could export its oil but Texas producers could not.  I’m disappointed that the oil export ban was not a stand-alone piece of legislation and that the Obama Administration held it hostage all year.  This ban should have been lifted in a more responsible way a long time ago, but president Obama prevented that.  Nevertheless, I appreciate the hard work of the members of Congress who fought to lift the ban so our Texas energy producers can compete on a level playing field.”

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Dec. 15 Conference

    December 17, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed $325,555 in fines involving 175 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety.

    Operators were assessed $82,829 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found on the RRC website here.    

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules and assessed $37,476 for oil and gas and LP-Gas rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $205,250 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules. Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found on the RRC website here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders.

  • Railroad Commissioners Appoint Agency General Counsel

    Alexander Schoch Brings Diverse Legal Background to Commission
    December 15, 2015

    AUSTIN – Chairman David Porter and Commissioners Christi Craddick and Ryan Sitton today voted unanimously to appoint Alexander Schoch general counsel for the Railroad Commission of Texas. Schoch brings more than 30 years of executive and industry-related legal experience to the Commission. 

    Chairman Porter said, “Mr. Schoch’s role as general counsel is critical in combatting federal overreach and preserving the Commission’s stable regulatory framework, which is one of the primary reasons for the success of the Texas oil and gas industry. With his extensive legal expertise in Texas, combined with his essential understanding of Commission rules, he possesses the central qualities the agency needs to continue effectively regulating the energy industries that drive our economy.” 

    Commissioner Craddick said, “We are fortunate at the Railroad Commission to have an attorney of Alex’s stature and professional experience join our team. Our statutes and rules over the energy industry are unique and have helped to make Texas the nation’s leading energy producer. We welcome Alex to help carry on this honorable tradition.” 

    Commissioner Sitton said, “Alex Schoch is an outstanding attorney with an incredible resume that includes energy and regulatory experience. The Commission could not afford someone of Alex’s caliber. He accepted the position so he could use his experience and give back. For that I am extremely grateful.” 

    Schoch retired from Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private-sector coal company, earlier this year where he most recently served as Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Secretary. Schoch previously held executive legal positions with various segments of the Goodrich Corporation. He also served as an international attorney for Marathon Oil Corporation. He is a member of the State Bar of Texas and the American Bar Association, and was recently elected to be a member of the American Law Institute."

     “The Railroad Commission of Texas has a long history of effective, efficient regulation of energy and that is largely the result of sound legal understanding and implementation of the laws of this state and the rules of the Commission,” said Schoch. “I look forward to building on that history with my expertise in energy law and deep experience leading legal teams involved in very complex legal and regulatory issues.” 

    As general counsel, Schoch will earn an annual salary of $100,000. Schoch will join the Commission in early 2016.

  • Railroad Commissioners Appoint New Executive Director for Agency

    Veteran Oil and Gas Executive Kimberly Corley to Lead Commission Operations
    December 15, 2015

    AUSTIN – Chairman David Porter and Commissioners Christi Craddick and Ryan Sitton today voted unanimously to appoint Kimberly Corley executive director of the Railroad Commission of Texas. Corley brings to the Commission more than 30 years of technical, policy and strategic expertise in oil and gas and pipeline operations. 

    Chairman Porter said, “After conducting a nationwide search, I am excited that we have found such an exceptional candidate to direct the operations of this important agency. Ms. Corley’s technical expertise, executive experience and industry knowledge will be incredibly valuable assets to the Commission, and I am confident that she will be an excellent leader. I look forward to working with her over the next year, as we continue to safely, efficiently and economically regulate the industries that serve as the backbone of the Texas economy.” 

    Commissioner Craddick said, “Kim has spent her entire career focused on safe, responsible development of our energy resources, and we’re pleased she will continue that critical work for the people of Texas. Her breadth and depth of experience will provide a fresh perspective to the agency that will help ensure the Railroad Commission remains the global leader in energy regulation.” 

    Commissioner Sitton said, “Kim Corley is going to be an outstanding Railroad Commission Executive Director.  Even though commodity prices are down, future opportunities in Texas oil and gas development are going to continue to be a vital part of our economy.  Kim’s experience in large scale capital development is a perfect fit.  Her industry and management experience are going to be a tremendous asset to the commission and to the people of the state of Texas.”   

    Corley retired from the Shell Oil Company earlier this year, where she held several executive leadership positions, most recently as Business Development Manager for Gas Monetization and General Manager of Construction Risk Mitigation and Workforce Development for Shell Upstream Americas. Previously, she served in various executive leadership roles within Shell Oil. Before joining Shell Oil, Corley held various executive and leadership positions with oil and gas and pipeline companies, including Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, El Paso Corporation and Tenneco Energy. 

    “Having spent my entire professional career in the energy industry, I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to use my experience and expertise in service to the people of Texas,” said Corley. “Texas is a world leader in energy production, and the Railroad Commission is widely recognized as a global leader in energy regulation. I look forward to working with the Commissioners and the nearly 800 men and women of the Commission to ensure we are protecting public safety and our natural resources by maintaining a fair and stable regulatory environment in which the industry operates, safely, responsibly and successfully.” 

    Corley earned a Bachelor’s of Business Administration from Sam Houston State University and Masters of Liberal Studies with concentration in Environmental Science and Policy from Rice University. She has also served on several professional boards, including Chair of the North American Carbon Capture and Storage Association, National Center for Construction Education & Research, Texas Oil and Gas Association and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership. 

    As executive director, Corley will earn an annual salary of $180,000. She will join the Commission early in 2016.

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Dec. 8 Conference

    December 11, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed $349,902 in fines involving 218 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety. 

    Operators were assessed $59,402 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found on the RRC website here.

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules and assessed $16,750 for LP-Gas rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $273,750 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules. Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found on the RRC website here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders.

  • Texas Drilling Permits and Completions Statistics for November 2015

    December 08, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) issued a total of 687 original drilling permits in November 2015 compared to 1,508 in November 2014. The November total included 584 permits to drill new oil or gas wells, eleven to re-enter plugged well bores and 92 for re-completions of existing well bores. The breakdown of well types for those permits issued November 2015 included 173 oil, 47 gas, 441 oil or gas, 15 injection, zero service and 11 other permits.

    In November 2015, Commission staff processed 776 oil, 150 gas, 35 injection and four other completions compared to 1,570 oil, 380 gas, 36 injection and five other completions in November 2014. Total well completions for 2015 year to date are 18,510 down from 27,595 recorded during the same period in 2014.

    According to Baker Hughes Inc., the Texas rig count as of December 4 was 333, representing about 45 percent of all active rigs in the United States.

    For additional drilling permit and completion statistics, visit the Commission’s monthly drilling completion summaries web page.

    TABLE 1 – NOVEMBER TEXAS OIL AND GAS DRILLING PERMITS AND COMPLETIONS BY RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS DISTRICT*

    DISTRICT

    PERMITS TO DRILL OIL/GAS HOLES

    OIL COMPLETIONS

    GAS COMPLETIONS

    (1) SAN ANTONIO AREA

    72

    164

    25

    (2) REFUGIO AREA

    88

    67

    30

    (3) SOUTHEAST TEXAS

    31

    37

    19

    (4) DEEP SOUTH TEXAS

    16

    2

    3

    (5) EAST CENTRAL TX

    12

    4

    2

    (6) EAST TEXAS

    22

    6

    7

    (7B) WEST CENTRAL TX

    40

    17

    3

    (7C) SAN ANGELO AREA

    37

    61

    0

    (8) MIDLAND

    262

    318

    8

    (8A) LUBBOCK AREA

    38

    37

    0

    (9) NORTH TEXAS

    58

    40

    12

    (10) PANHANDLE

    11

    23

    41

    *A district map is available on the Railroad Commission of Texas here.

  • Railroad Commissioners Warn Against Federal Overreach of Proposed Methane Emission Rules on Oil and Gas Operations

    Proposed Rules Would Unfairly Burden Operators; Cost Texas Jobs
    December 08, 2015

    AUSTINRailroad Commission Chairman David Porter and Commissioners Christi Craddick and Ryan Sitton today warned against further federal overreach of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rules on methane emissions for oil and gas operators. The Commission recently submitted formal comments on the proposed rules, highlighting the overreach of regulation by the federal government, the unnecessary cost to oil and gas operators, and the likelihood additional costs would stifle innovation and jobs in the industry.

    Chairman Porter said, “These rules are another attempt by the federal government to take over regulation of our state’s oil and gas industry. Texas has regulated this important industry in a robust and responsible manner for almost a century. These regulations are unnecessary and over-burdensome and will only impede industry, damage our economy and kill the jobs Texans rely on to support their families.”

    Commissioner Craddick said, “While production has increased by more than 400 percent, responsible drilling initiatives and technologies have led to a 13.3 percent reduction in methane emissions from shale development since 2008. EPA’s recent onerous proposal for duplicative, costly methane regulations will stifle the progress made as a direct result of industry initiatives already in place. We know that while good rules foster growth, poorly conceived policies stymie growth. This new proposal certainly fits the mold of EPA’s repeated attempts to repress our nation’s leadership in fossil fuel production.”

    Commissioner Sitton said, “The Railroad Commission knows how to regulate the oil and gas industry in Texas, and our sister agency, the TCEQ, does an excellent job of regulating air quality in Texas.  The federal government’s continued push to implement one-size-fits-all environmental regulatory approaches is absurd.  States need to retain their primary jurisdiction, and federal agencies should stop usurping congressional power by promulgating rules that go beyond their statutory authority.” 

    The Commissioners’ statements follow discussion of the proposed methane emission rules during their regularly scheduled conference earlier today.

    To read the comments submitted by the Commission, please CLICK HERE and HERE.

  • Commissioner Sitton Discusses Importance of Responsible Regulation & Energy Production at today’s Oil & Gas Environmental Conference

    December 02, 2015

    DALLAS – Commissioner Ryan Sitton today discussed the importance of responsible regulation and energy production at an Oil & Gas Environmental Conference. The event was hosted by the Environmental Training Institute of the University of Texas at Arlington. The two-day conference featured presentations by energy regulators from several energy-producing states.

    “Texas is leading the way as the United States competes in the global energy race,” Commissioner Sitton told the gathering.  “In spite of a challenging commodities environment, Texas oil and natural gas producers are becoming more efficient and doing their part to produce our abundant energy resources in a manner that protects public safety and our environment.  Our job as regulators is to maintain a predictable and fair regulatory regime so energy producers can effectively do what they do best – responsibly produce energy.  And no one in the world does a better job of responsibly producing energy than our operators in Texas,” concluded Sitton.


    Elected to the Railroad Commission Nov. 4, 2014 to a six-year term, Commissioner Ryan Sitton won the general election with over 58 percent of the vote.Sitton is a native Texan who grew up in the Irving area. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University where he earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and met his wife, Jennifer. Following college, Ryan went to work as an engineer in the energy industry. In 2006 Ryan and Jennifer founded PinnacleAIS, an engineering and technology company focused on reliability and integrity programs for the oil, gas, and petrochemical industries.

November

  • RRC Chairman Porter Warns Against Job-Killing, Frivolous Oil & Gas Lawsuits

    Says Suits Inspired by Hillary Clinton’s Radical Climate Change Agenda
    November 30, 2015

    AUSTINRailroad Commission Chairman David Porter today sent a letter to Attorney General Ken Paxton warning of frivolous state lawsuits and investigations currently being carried out and considered by other state attorney generals. Chairman Porter’s letter points out these suits are inspired by presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s radical environmental claims that energy companies should be financially punished for their alleged contribution to climate change. 

    “Radical environmentalist ideology is increasingly masquerading as scientific fact and causing a chilling effect on credible climate science and free speech,” said Porter, who also serves as the chairman of the three-member Texas energy authority. “In reality, it’s nothing more than an effort by liberal ideologues to punish entities that do not share their religious zeal on the issue, and ultimately force the energy industry into a position in which its own resources are unjustly and unfairly used against itself in the war on fossil fuels.” 

    To read Chairman Porter's letter to General Paxton, CLICK HERE. 

    Earlier this month, the New York Attorney General began an investigation into whether Exxon Mobile Corp. should be held responsible for its alleged contribution to climate change. Clinton prompted the charges in October at a campaign stop. 

    Chairman Porter concluded, “I encourage you to be wary of similar efforts in Texas, so that together we can continue protecting our state’s natural resources, as well as the economic vitality of the industry that produces these resources, employs hundreds of thousands of Texans and paves the way for American energy independence.” 


    Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter was elected statewide by the people of Texas to serve as a member of the Commission in November 2010. A Certified Public Accountant and successful small business owner, Chairman Porter has worked with oil and gas producers for nearly three decades providing strategic financial advice and tax counsel. He is the senior member of the Commission with a proven record of principle-driven, free market conservative leadership.

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Nov. 17 Conference

    November 20, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed more than $364,706 in fines involving 216 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety. 

    Operators were assessed $80,996 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found here

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules and assessed $24,710 for oil and gas, LP-Gas and GUD rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $259,000 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules. Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders.

  • Texas Oil and Gas Production Statistics for September 2015

    November 18, 2015

    AUSTIN – Production for September 2015 as reported to the Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) is 72,849,838 barrels of crude oil and 620,188,919 MCF (thousand cubic feet) of total gas from oil and gas wells.  These preliminary figures are based on production volumes reported by operators and will be updated as late and corrected production reports are received.  Production reported to the Commission for the same time period last year, September 2014, was: 65,824,450 barrels of crude oil preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 82,786,181 barrels; and 595,603,581 Mcf of total gas preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 712,717,634 Mcf.

    The Commission reports that in the last 12 months, total Texas reported production was 1.008 billion barrels of crude oil and 8.4 trillion cubic feet of total gas.  Crude oil production reported by the Commission is limited to oil produced from oil leases and does not include condensate, which is reported separately by the Commission.

    Texas preliminary September 2015 crude oil production averaged 2,428,328 barrels daily, compared to the 2,194,148 barrels daily average of September 2014.

    Texas preliminary September 2015 total gas production averaged 20,672,964 Mcf (thousand cubic feet) a day, compared to the 19,853,453 Mcf daily average of September 2014.

    Texas production in September 2015 came from 181,179 oil wells and 95,834 gas wells.

    For additional oil and gas production statistics, visit the RRC’s Oil & Gas Production web page.


    TABLE 1
      SEPTEMBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN OIL CRUDE OIL PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CRUDE OIL (BBLS)

        1.

    KARNES

    6,148,235

        2.

    LA SALLE

    4,360,776

        3.

    DEWITT

    4,040,054

        4.

    MIDLAND

    3,207,440

        5.

    MCMULLEN

    3,200,733

        6.

    UPTON

    3,147,206

        7.

    ANDREWS

    3,043,570

        8.

    MARTIN

    2,875,497

        9.

    GONZALES

    2,852,287

      10.

    REEVES

    2,484,584


    TABLE 2 – SEPTEMBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL GAS (GAS WELL GAS & CASINGHEAD) PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    TOTAL GAS (MCF)

        1.

    WEBB

    55,039,138

        2.

    TARRANT

    44,847,974

        3.

    PANOLA

    25,244,536

        4.

    DIMMIT

    23,507,205

        5.

    JOHNSON

    21,055,724

        6.

    KARNES

    20,425,146

        7.

    DEWITT

    20,040,396

        8.

    WISE

    18,039,390

        9.

    LA SALLE

    17,164,698

      10.

    DENTON

    15,782,656


    TABLE 3 – SEPTEMBER 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL CONDENSATE PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CONDENSATE (BBLS)

        1.

    DIMMIT

    2,219,686

        2.

    WEBB

    1,309,361

        3.

    KARNES

    1,280,560

        4.

    DEWITT

    1,100,501

        5.

    CULBERSON

    675,448

        6.

    LIVE OAK

    611,157

        7.

    REEVES

    368,246

        8.

    LA SALLE

    350,827

        9.

    MCMULLEN

    280,144

      10.

    WHEELER

    233,850

  • RRC Chairman Renews Call for Stronger Border and Critical Infrastructure Security

    Demands Obama Administration Take Steps to Protect American People, Economy Following Paris Attacks
    November 16, 2015

    AUSTIN – Railroad Commissioner David Porter today renewed his call for a stronger commitment from the Obama Administration and Department of Homeland Security to protect Texas’ critical infrastructure through securing the border. Chairman Porter expressed the urgency of such action in a letter to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson. 

    “It’s been more than a year since I first asked the Department of Homeland Security to take the threat of a terrorist attack against our critical infrastructure seriously, and we are still in the same position,” said Porter, who is now the Chairman of the state’s chief energy regulator. “In light of the Paris attacks, I am compelled to reiterate concerns I have vocalized about the security of our energy industry, which is the backbone of the Texas economy.” 

    Chairman Porter first registered his concerns last year to the Homeland Security Agency, Customs and Border Protection, about the failure of the federal government to secure the U.S. border, and how that failure endangers Texas’ critical energy infrastructure. More than 425,000 miles of pipeline are in place to carry our state’s oil and gas to market, and a significant portion of this infrastructure is in the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas, which remains vulnerable due to its proximity to the unsecured border.  

    Chairman Porter cited recent attacks by ISIS against oil and gas pipelines and facilities as a modus operandi that they may use against one of Texas’ most abundant and valuable economic resources. In his letter, Chairman Porter pointed to one ISIS coordinated attack on three continents, which included a natural gas plant in France that left one employee decapitated. Other accounts include reports from Egypt where radicals attacked their own country’s energy infrastructure to destabilize the government. Another included Yemeni terrorists attacking major oil pipelines as a tactic in their war against the West. The Yemeni oil minister said that these attacks cost their country nearly $1 billion in lost revenue in 2012.  

    “In light of these facts, I would encourage you to pressure the White House and instruct Customs and Border Protection to take these concerns seriously, instead of waiting until it is too late. My office is at your disposal to provide advice and counsel, so we can take this issue head on, and ensure that our people and infrastructure are protected from any and all nefarious groups,” said Chairman Porter. 

    Letter to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security

    The RRC is the chief energy regulator for the state of Texas, having primary regulatory jurisdiction over the oil and natural gas industry, as well as pipelines, natural gas utilities, the propane industry, and coal and uranium surface mining operations. The agency works to ensure fair and consistent energy regulation in Texas so businesses can safely, efficiently, and economically produce the energy that is needed to power Texans and the Texas economy.   

  • Commissioner Craddick Receives Hearst Energy Award for Government Service

    November 13, 2015

    MIDLAND – Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick is the 2015 recipient of the Hearst Energy Award for Government Service. Craddick received the honor at the 20th annual Midland Reporter-Telegram Hearst Energy Awards in Midland. The annual ceremony recognizes industry excellence in technology, company performance, government service, lifetime achievement and environmental stewardship. 

    “Aside from contributing to more than a third of our state’s economy, the oil and gas industry has shaped a way of life in Texas for over a century,” Craddick said. “Oil and gas production has kept this state growing, creating jobs for our families and generating surplus revenue for important state budgetary items like health care and education for all Texans. Today, almost every aspect of modern life is impacted by oil and gas. Texas is blessed with an abundance of mineral resources that will provide economic opportunity for our state for many years to come.” 

    Commissioner Craddick reflected on the substantial impact of the Commission during her time in office on the industry, and on the state of Texas with regard to oil and gas production and regulation as a whole. 

    “We have accomplished a number of milestones during my first three years in office that have comprehensively driven the commission forward as a trailblazer in oil and gas regulation,” Craddick said. “Major rule amendments have been key, as well as budget and efficiency initiatives, an IT overhaul and a new communications strategy. The commission has often led the regulatory discussion with exemplary rules and regulations as innovation and technology continues to transform industry best practices. The past three years have been no different. Today, we are a fully funded, more efficient and transparent agency participating in an open dialogue with Texans about the state’s important mineral resources and the commission’s long history of regulatory leadership. These are long-term initiatives, we still have a lot of work to do, and I am looking forward to the next three years.” 

    Past recipients of the Hearst Energy Award for Government Service include Railroad Commissioners Victor Carrillo and Charles Matthews, Congressmen Lamar Smith and Joe Barton, State Senator Kel Seliger, and State Representatives Tom Craddick and Warren Chisum.

    Commissioner Craddick receiving the 2015 Hearst Energy Award for Government Service from Midland Reporter-Telegram energy reporter, Mella McEwen. Photo courtesy of Midland Reporter-Telegram
    Commissioner Craddick (right) receiving the 2015 Hearst Energy Award for Government Service from Midland Reporter-Telegram energy reporter, Mella McEwen. Photo courtesy of Midland Reporter-Telegram


    Christi Craddick was elected statewide by the people of Texas in November 2012 to serve a six-year term as Texas Railroad Commissioner. A native of Midland, Christi is an attorney specializing in oil and gas, water, tax issues, electric deregulation and environmental policy.

  • Texas Drilling Permits and Completions Statistics for October 2015

    November 10, 2015

    AUSTIN –– The Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) issued a total of 822 original drilling permits in October 2015 compared to 3,046 in October 2014. The October total included 689 permits to drill new oil or gas wells, four to re-enter plugged well bores and 129 for re-completions of existing well bores. The breakdown of well types for those permits issued in October 2015 included 198 oil, 54 gas, 524 oil or gas, 34 injection, one service and 11 other permits.

    In October 2015, Commission staff processed 1,138 oil, 196 gas, 53 injection and nine other completions compared to 2,035 oil, 354 gas, 63 injection and three other completions in October 2014. Total well completions for 2015 year to date are 17,545 down from 25,604 recorded during the same period in 2014.

    According to Baker Hughes Inc., the Texas rig count as of November 6 was 340, representing about 44 percent of all active rigs in the United States.

    For additional drilling permit and completion statistics, visit the Commission’s monthly drilling completion summaries web page.

    TABLE 1 – OCTOBER TEXAS OIL AND GAS DRILLING PERMITS AND COMPLETIONS BY RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS DISTRICT*

    DISTRICT

    PERMITS TO DRILL OIL/GAS HOLES

    OIL COMPLETIONS

    GAS COMPLETIONS

    (1) SAN ANTONIO AREA

    106

    190

    46

    (2) REFUGIO AREA

    92

    105

    14

    (3) SOUTHEAST TEXAS

    39

    31

    8

    (4) DEEP SOUTH TEXAS

    30

    14

    16

    (5) EAST CENTRAL TX

    6

    6

    2

    (6) EAST TEXAS

    29

    10

    12

    (7B) WEST CENTRAL TX

    22

    20

    3

    (7C) SAN ANGELO AREA

    89

    89

    2

    (8) MIDLAND

    256

    551

    27

    (8A) LUBBOCK AREA

    80

    39

    0

    (9) NORTH TEXAS

    52

    45

    5

    (10) PANHANDLE

    21

    38

    61

    *A district map is available on the Railroad Commission of Texas here.

  • Chairman David Porter Addresses 21st Annual Executive Oil Conference

    Says Texas Owes Economic Strength to Innovation, Regulatory Framework & Leadership
    November 10, 2015

    MIDLANDRailroad Commission Chairman David Porter today at the 21st Annual Executive Oil Conference discussed the current state of the oil and gas industry and the important roles of leadership, law and policy when developing energy resources. Porter—who heads the state agency that regulates oil and gas exploration and production in Texas—emphasized that a strong, stable regulatory environment is critical to the health of the energy industry, especially with recent volatility in energy markets. 

    “Texas is stronger today because of oil and gas shale development. The success of shale is largely due to our regulatory environment and industry-leading innovation,” Porter said. “During this downturn, we need to make sure the energy industry is able to produce fairly, efficiently and economically, so we can continue building upon that strength. We need state and national leaders that will help us keep our job growth strong and our economy thriving, and leaders who will make energy independence a priority.” 

    Porter applauded the Texas energy industry for improvements in its best practices and attributed those changes to Texas’ continued strength during times of economic challenge. 

    “We’ve maintained record production levels – in the face of major challenges – here in Texas because industry has become more innovative and more efficient, and that is an accomplishment to be very proud of,” Porter said.

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Nov. 3 Conference

    November 06, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed more than $488,783 in fines involving 215 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety.

    Operators were assessed $87,655 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found here.

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules and assessed $134,628 for oil and gas, LP-Gas and GUD rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $266,500 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules.  Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders.

October

  • ICYMI: Commissioner Craddick Discusses State of Texas Energy Industry at the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival

    October 27, 2015

    AUSTIN – Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick discusses the state of the Texas energy industry and the Railroad Commission’s priorities in an interview with Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold at the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival. 

    The interview can be found here.

    Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold interviews Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick at the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival. Photo provided courtesy of Texas Tribune.
    Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold interviews Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick at the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival. Photo provided courtesy of Texas Tribune.


    Christi Craddick was elected statewide by the people of Texas in November 2012 to serve a six-year term as Texas Railroad Commissioner. A native of Midland, Christi is an attorney specializing in oil and gas, water, tax issues, electric deregulation and environmental policy.

  • Commissioner Sitton Addresses the Texas Mining and Reclamation Association’s Annual Meeting

    October 27, 2015

    BASTROP – Commissioner Ryan Sitton spoke today at the Texas Mining and Reclamation Association’s Annual Meeting. The event was held in Bastrop, Texas. Commissioner Sitton serves as Texas’ representative on the Interstate Mining and Compact Commission.

    “Mining for energy in the state of Texas provides a critical component of our energy portfolio,” Commissioner Sitton told the gathering.  “As Texas seeks to expand its energy capabilities in every category, mined energy will remain a key resource.  In 2014, approximately 36 percent of the ERCOT market was supplied by members of TMRA.  Providing low-cost energy to Texans in an environmentally sensitive way is a mission of TMRA’s that I support,” concluded Sitton.

    Sitton speaking to crowd in Bastrop, Tx.

    Elected to the Railroad Commission Nov. 4, 2014 to a six-year term, Commissioner Ryan Sitton won the general election with over 58 percent of the vote. Sitton is a native Texan who grew up in the Irving area. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University where he earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and met his wife, Jennifer. Following college, Ryan went to work as an engineer in the energy industry. In 2006 Ryan and Jennifer founded PinnacleAIS, an engineering and technology company focused on reliability and integrity programs for the oil, gas, and petrochemical industries.
  • ICYMI Chairman David Porter Column “Partners in Protecting Texas”

    October 26, 2015

    AUSTINIn Case You Missed It, see Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter’s Column on how the Railroad Commission works in partnership with local communities in protecting the public and natural resources here.


    Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter was elected statewide by the people of Texas to serve as a member of the Commission in November 2010. A Certified Public Accountant and successful small business owner, Chairman Porter has worked with oil and gas producers for nearly three decades providing strategic financial advice and tax counsel. He is the senior member of the Commission with a proven record of principle-driven, free market conservative leadership.

  • Texas Oil and Gas Production Statistics for August 2015

    October 26, 2015

    AUSTIN –– Production for August 2015 as reported to the Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) is 74,679,202 barrels of crude oil and 624,110,098 MCF (thousand cubic feet) of total gas from oil and gas wells. These preliminary figures are based on production volumes reported by operators and will be updated as late and corrected production reports are received.  Production reported to the Commission for the same time period last year, August 2014, was: 69,204,407 barrels of crude oil preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 85,302,001 barrels; and 621,505,586 Mcf of total gas preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 742,510,547 Mcf.

    The Commission reports that in the last 12 months, total Texas reported production was 1.001 billion barrels of crude oil and 8.4 trillion cubic feet of total gas. Crude oil production reported by the Commission is limited to oil produced from oil leases and does not include condensate, which is reported separately by the Commission.

    Texas preliminary August 2015 crude oil production averaged 2,409,007 barrels daily, compared to the 2,232,400 barrels daily average of August 2014.

    Texas preliminary August 2015 total gas production averaged 20,132,584 Mcf (thousand cubic feet) a day, compared to the 20,048,567 Mcf daily average of August 2014.

    Texas production in August 2015 came from 177,924 oil wells and 95,618 gas wells.

    For additional oil and gas production statistics, visit the RRC’s Oil & Gas Production web page.


    TABLE 1
      AUGUST 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN OIL CRUDE OIL PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CRUDE OIL (BBLS)

        1.

    KARNES

    6,533,359

        2.

    LA SALLE

    4,521,043

        3.

    DEWITT

    4,221,778

        4.

    MIDLAND

    3,576,095

        5.

    MCMULLEN

    3,251,518

        6.

    UPTON

    3,164,511

        7.

    ANDREWS

    3,007,073

        8.

    GONZALES

    2,940,514

        9.

    MARTIN

    2,929,563

      10.

    REEVES

    2,468,109


    TABLE 2 – AUGUST 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL GAS (GAS WELL GAS & CASINGHEAD) PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    TOTAL GAS (MCF)

        1.

    TARRANT

    50,354,754

        2.

    WEBB

    29,817,871

        3.

    PANOLA

    26,569,372

        4.

    DIMMIT

    24,238,069

        5.

    JOHNSON

    21,976,303

        6.

    DEWITT

    21,126,440

        7.

    KARNES

    21,019,579

        8.

    WISE

    20,605,574

        9.

    DENTON

    17,519,070

      10.

    LA SALLE

    16,875,899


    TABLE 3 – AUGUST 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL CONDENSATE PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CONDENSATE (BBLS)

        1.

    DIMMIT

    2,266,142

        2.

    KARNES

    1,254,403

        3.

    DEWITT

    1,194,964

        4.

    WEBB

    1,012,330

        5.

    LIVE OAK

    604,716

        6.

    CULBERSON

    569,470

        7.

    LA SALLE

    377,620

        8.

    MCMULLEN

    314,496

        9.

    WHEELER

    306,749

      10.

    REEVES

    250,189

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Oct. 20 Conference

    October 23, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed more than $497,449 in fines involving 188 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety.

    Operators were assessed $229,230 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found here

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules and assessed $50,219 for oil and gas, LP-Gas and GUD rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $218,000 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules.  Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders.

  • Chairman David Porter Directs RRC to Oppose New Federal Mining Rule

    Asserts proposed rule will hurt Texas economy and threaten state primacy
    October 20, 2015

    AUSTIN – Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter today at the Commission’s open meeting directed agency staff to sign a letter supporting the Interstate Mining Compact Commission’s comments on the Stream Protection Rule proposed by the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE). Porter emphasized that the 1200 page OSMRE rule threatens the Texas economy and compromises state primacy of surface mining regulation.

    “This rule will be very costly to the national and Texas economies, and in addition, it takes away our flexibility to determine the types of bonding we choose to use when permitting mines. I’m worried anytime I see the federal government taking away flexibility on important regulatory tools from the states,” Porter said. “Texas is the sixth largest coal producer in the U.S., and the Railroad Commission has safely regulated state surface mining since 1981. This is just one more example of the federal government overregulating and hurting our economy.”

    Citing a study conducted by the National Mining Association, Porter explained that the proposed rule requires a rewrite of approximately 475 different coal mining regulations and puts almost 71 percent of all current mining and mining-related employment at risk.


     Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter was elected statewide by the people of Texas to serve as a member of the Commission in November 2010. A Certified Public Accountant and successful small business owner, Chairman Porter has worked with oil and gas producers for nearly three decades providing strategic financial advice and tax counsel. He is the senior member of the Commission with a proven record of principle-driven, free market conservative leadership.

  • Chairman David Porter Addresses Permian Basin Petroleum Association

    Applauds Permian Basin Oil & Gas Industry for Maintaining Strong Production Levels
    October 15, 2015

    MIDLANDRailroad Commission Chairman David Porter today praised Permian Basin producers for maintaining strong production levels even as oil and gas activity slows nationwide. Porter made his comments at the Permian Basin Petroleum Association’s (PBPA) 53rd Annual Meeting.

    “About 43 percent of the nation’s remaining rigs are in Texas; and about half of them are in the Texas Permian Basin. That’s about a quarter of the rigs in America,” Porter said. “Being from Midland, I am proud of West Texas. I am confident that if anyone can help the U.S. navigate this downturn in energy prices, it’s our Texas producers – especially those in the Permian.”

    Porter – who leads the state’s energy regulatory agency – attributes much of Texas’ success to its world-renowned regulatory environment, and he emphasized the negative impact of federal overreach.

    “Unfortunately, our regulatory framework is continuously threatened by lawmakers and bureaucrats in D.C.,” Porter said. “Texas is stronger today because of our revolutionary oil and gas shale development, and this strength could extend to other states if the federal government relied on stable, free-market policies, and stopped intervening in industry business practices.”


    Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter was elected statewide by the people of Texas to serve as a member of the Commission in November 2010. A Certified Public Accountant and successful small business owner, Chairman Porter has worked with oil and gas producers for nearly three decades providing strategic financial advice and tax counsel. He is the senior member of the Commission with a proven record of principle-driven, free market conservative leadership.

  • Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter’s Statement on House Vote to Repeal Federal Crude Export Ban

    October 12, 2015

    AUSTIN — The U.S. House of Representatives Friday voted 261-159 to lift the 40-year-old Federal crude oil export ban, which Congress first put in place after the 1970s Arab oil embargo.

    The following quote may be attributed to Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter:

    “I commend the U.S. House for voting to overturn the Federal crude oil export ban and hope the Senate and White House will support this effort as well. Our inability to compete in the international marketplace makes our oil supply and demand especially vulnerable to volatile OPEC practices. Lifting the Federal crude oil export ban would spur new American energy production, foster economic growth and job creation, and take us one step closer to energy independence.


     

    Texas Railroad Commission Chairman David Porter was elected statewide by the people of Texas to serve as a member of the Commission in November 2010. A Certified Public Accountant and successful small business owner, Chairman Porter has worked with oil and gas producers for nearly three decades providing strategic financial advice and tax counsel. He is the senior member of the Commission with a proven record of principle-driven, free market conservative leadership.

  • Texas Drilling Permits and Completions Statistics for September 2015

    October 09, 2015

    AUSTIN –– The Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) issued a total of 906 original drilling permits in September 2015 compared to 3,013 in September 2014. The September total included 795 permits to drill new oil or gas wells, six to re-enter plugged well bores and 105 for re-completions of existing well bores. The breakdown of well types for those permits issued in September 2015 included 202 oil, 77 gas, 582 oil or gas, 34 injection, zero service and 11 other permits.

    In September 2015, Commission staff processed 1,153 oil, 284 gas, 41 injection and six other completions compared to 2,048 oil, 328 gas, 109 injection and seven other completions in September 2014. Total well completions for 2015 year to date are 16,149 down from 23,149 recorded during the same period in 2014.

    According to Baker Hughes Inc., the Texas rig count as of October 9 was 353, representing about 44 percent of all active rigs in the United States.

    For additional drilling permit and completion statistics, visit the Commission’s monthly drilling completion summaries web page.

    TABLE 1 – SEPTEMBER TEXAS OIL AND GAS DRILLING PERMITS AND COMPLETIONS BY RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS DISTRICT

    DISTRICT

    PERMITS TO DRILL OIL/GAS HOLES

    OIL COMPLETIONS

    GAS COMPLETIONS

    (1) SAN ANTONIO AREA

    126

    252

    59

    (2) REFUGIO AREA

    109

    101

    44

    (3) SOUTHEAST TEXAS

    49

    80

    7

    (4) DEEP SOUTH TEXAS

    19

    29

    27

    (5) EAST CENTRAL TX

    25

    10

    3

    (6) EAST TEXAS

    30

    15

    8

    (7B) WEST CENTRAL TX

    35

    27

    1

    (7C) SAN ANGELO AREA

    86

    92

    1

    (8) MIDLAND

    302

    504

    43

    (8A) LUBBOCK AREA

    46

    56

    0

    (9) NORTH TEXAS

    60

    122

    66

    (10) PANHANDLE

    19

    76

    25

  • RRC Enforcement Actions Taken at Commissioners’ Oct. 6 Conference

    October 09, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas assessed more than $1.1 million in fines involving 432 enforcement dockets against operators and businesses at the Commissioners’ conference earlier this week. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas industry and intrastate pipeline safety. 

    One operator was assessed $75,688 in four oil & gas protested enforcement dockets that went to hearing. 

    Operators were assessed $461,253 after failing to appear at Commission enforcement proceedings. Details on these Master Default Orders can be found here.

    Operators were ordered to come into compliance with Commission rules; remediate pollution; plug or shut in wells; and assessed $67,997 for oil and gas, LP-Gas and Pipeline Safety rule violations. Pipeline operators and excavators were assessed $549,500 for violations of the Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention rules. Details on all these Master Agreed Orders can be found here.

    In the absence of timely motions for rehearing, decisions are final as stated in these final orders. 

  • Railroad Commission’s Hearings Division Closes Record Number of Oil & Gas Administrative Law Cases in Fiscal Year 2015

    October 06, 2015

    AUSTIN – The Railroad Commission of Texas’s Hearings Division closed a record 1,057 oil and gas dockets or administrative law cases in Fiscal Year 2015—the highest recorded in seven years. The dockets closed in FY15 also represented 263 more cases closed in FY15 compared to the previous year’s total of 794 dockets closed in FY14. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas exploration and production industry. 

    Hearings at the Railroad Commission are held before a legal examiner and an administrative law judge and can involve protested oil and gas enforcement cases; permit applications for oil and gas facilities such as disposal wells; and requests for changes in field rules or field consolidations.

     

  • Railroad Commission Oil & Gas Enforcement Actions on the Rise in Fiscal Year 2015

    October 05, 2015

    AUSTIN –The Railroad Commission of Texas conducted more than 3,600 additional oil and gas inspections and assessed almost $1 million more in penalties in Fiscal Year 2015 compared to Fiscal Year 2014. The number of violations identified through oil and gas inspections also dropped by more than 1,100 violations from FY 2015 compared to FY 2014. The Commission has primary oversight and enforcement of the state’s oil and gas exploration and production industry. 

    Specifically, the Commission conducted 134,484 oil and gas inspections in FY 2015 compared to 130,812 in FY 2014, and during inspections found 61,189 violations in FY 2015 compared to 62,385 violations cited in FY 2014. Additionally, the Commission assessed $3,603,050 in administrative penalties in FY 2015 compared to $2,616,723 in penalties assessed in FY 2014. 

    The number of pipeline severance and seal orders also dropped in FY 2015 to 9,481 from 11,541 in FY 2014. Pipeline severance and seal orders are important enforcement tools used by the Commission when operators fail to come into compliance with Commission rules. RRC severances and seal orders prohibit an operator from selling or moving their oil or natural gas off a lease, effectively shutting off income from the severed lease. 

    Details on the Commission’s fiscal year enforcement actions, including severance/seal orders can be found here. 

  • Commissioner Craddick Calls for Greater Cooperation Between Texas, Mexican Energy Officials to Benefit Shared Economy

    Congressman Cuellar Hosts U.S., Mexico Officials at Texas A&M International University
    October 02, 2015

    LAREDO – Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick today called for greater cooperation between Texas and Mexican energy officials during an international roundtable on oil and gas development. The discussion, hosted by Congressman Henry Cuellar at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, included U.S. and Mexican officials. 

    “Sharing in the great economic wealth generated across our border means that Texas and Mexico naturally share similar concerns in the development of our mineral resources, including workforce capital, infrastructure that responds to our supply and demand needs, and regulatory compatibility,” Craddick said. 

    The high-level gathering focused on developing a unique bi-national partnership including senior level executives in the oil and gas sectors, elected officials, and agency administrators, and worked to establish knowledge and cooperation in cross-border energy trade opportunities in both countries. 

    “As Mexico’s newly privatized energy industry continues to develop and looks to maximize productivity, the Railroad Commission looks forward to sharing our expertise that has made places like the Eagle Ford Shale and others so successful,” Craddick said. “North America’s energy opportunity is endless if we can find commonality on these important issues in unity with our North American partners.” 

    Christi Craddick was elected statewide by the people of Texas in November 2012 to serve a six-year term as Texas Railroad Commissioner. A native of Midland, Christi is an attorney specializing in oil and gas, water, tax issues, electric deregulation and environmental policy.

September

  • Commissioner Sitton Delivers Keynote Address at Permian Basin Workshop on Securing Oil and Gas Energy Supplies

    September 30, 2015

    MIDLAND – Commissioner Ryan Sitton today delivered the keynote address at the Texas Department of Homeland Security’s Permian Basin Workshop on oil and gas supply chain resilience.  The workshop focused on clearly defining the industry supply chain, identifying and addressing security and resilience concerns to improve supply chain preparedness and operations.  The event was held at the Midland International Air & Spaceport. 

    “Constant planning and preparation to protect the oil and gas supply chain is important to our state and national economies,” Commissioner Sitton told the gathering.  “Texas produces more oil and gas than any other state in the nation, and it has more miles of pipeline than any other state.  The protection of this critical infrastructure is a shared mission among numerous state, federal, and local agencies.  The Railroad Commission is proud to be a partner in securing our vital energy resources,” concluded Sitton.


    Elected to the Railroad Commission Nov. 4, 2014 to a six-year term, Commissioner Ryan Sitton won the general election with over 58 percent of the vote. Sitton is a native Texan who grew up in the Irving area. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University where he earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and met his wife, Jennifer. Following college, Ryan went to work as an engineer in the energy industry. In 2006 Ryan and Jennifer founded PinnacleAIS, an engineering and technology company focused on reliability and integrity programs for the oil, gas, and petrochemical industries.

  • ICYMI: Commissioner Craddick and Rep. McCaul Call for an End to U.S. Crude Oil Export Ban

    September 28, 2015

    AUSTIN-- Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick and U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul jointly call on the federal government to lift its ban on crude oil exports from the United States, highlighting the issue’s importance to the long-term success of the Texas oil and gas industry. Please see their opinion piece, published by the Houston Chronicle here.

     Christi Craddick was elected statewide by the people of Texas in November 2012 to serve a six-year term as Texas Railroad Commissioner. A native of Midland, Christi is an attorney specializing in oil and gas, water, tax issues, electric deregulation and environmental policy.

  • Texas Oil and Gas Production Statistics for July 2015

    September 25, 2015

    AUSTIN –– Production for July 2015 as reported to the Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission) is 76,150,903 barrels of crude oil and 656,846,810 Mcf (thousand cubic feet) of total gas from oil and gas wells. These preliminary figures are based on production volumes reported by operators and will be updated as late and corrected production reports are received.  Production reported to the Commission for the same time period last year, July 2014, was: 69,573,013 barrels of crude oil preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 83,999,620 barrels; and 632,494,096 Mcf of total gas preliminarily, updated to a current figure of 736,716,925 Mcf.

    The Commission reports that in the last 12 months, total Texas reported production was 997 million barrels of crude oil and 8.4 trillion cubic feet of total gas. Crude oil production reported by the Commission is limited to oil produced from oil leases and does not include condensate (the liquid hydrocarbons produced from gas wells). Condensate is reported separately by the Commission.

    Texas preliminary July 2015 crude oil production averaged 2,456,481 barrels daily, compared to the 2,244,291 barrels daily average of July 2014. 

    Texas preliminary July 2015 total gas production averaged 21,188,607 Mcf (thousand cubic feet) a day, compared to the 20,403,035 Mcf daily average of July 2014. 

    Texas production in July 2015 came from 176,180 oil wells and 96,098 gas wells.

    For additional oil and gas production statistics, including condensate statistics, visit the RRC’s Oil & Gas Production web page.

    Note that monthly gas storage statistics reported to the Commission, previously featured in this monthly news release, are now available on the Commission's Gas Storage Statistics web page.

     
    TABLE 1  JULY 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN OIL CRUDE OIL PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CRUDE OIL (BBLS)

        1.

    KARNES

    6,514,303

        2.

    DEWITT

    4,559,324

        3.

    LA SALLE

    4,522,697

        4.

    MIDLAND

    3,502,184

        5.

    MCMULLEN

    3,256,627

        6.

    MARTIN

    3,190,358

        7.

    GONZALES

    3,185,417

        8.

    UPTON

    3,105,902

        9.

    ANDREWS

    3,053,724

      10.

    REEVES

    2,632,342

     

    TABLE 2 – JULY 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL GAS (GAS WELL GAS & CASINGHEAD) PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    TOTAL GAS (MCF)

        1.

    WEBB

    59,626,777

        2.

    TARRANT

    50,927,167

        3.

    PANOLA

    26,896,803

        4.

    DIMMIT

    24,102,783

        5.

    DEWITT

    21,852,114

        6.

    JOHNSON

    21,733,155

        7.

    KARNES

    20,263,155

        8.

    WISE

    20,108,978

        9.

    LA SALLE

    17,648,068

      10.

    DENTON

    16,831,246

     

    TABLE 3 – JULY 2015 TEXAS TOP TEN TOTAL CONDENSATE PRODUCING COUNTIES RANKED BY PRELIMINARY PRODUCTION

    RANK

    COUNTY

    CONDENSATE (BBLS)

        1.

    DIMMIT

    2,210,515

        2.

    WEBB

    1,522,810

        3.

    KARNES

    1,293,775

        4.

    DEWITT

    1,197,427

        5.

    LIVE OAK

    564,940

        6.

    LA SALLE

    514,516

        7.

    CULBERSON

    426,112

        8.

    WHEELER

    312,617

        9.

    MCMULLEN

    242,668

      10.

    REEVES

    233,147





Commissioners